Never Fear Your Inbox Again: The Simple Guide To Stopping Email Overload



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Hey everyone, Kosio Angelov here, founder of High Performance Lifestyle, and welcome to another productivity-boosting training. In this one, I want to teach you something very practical, and that is how to reduce your email overload.

Email Is Killing Your Productivity

Before we get to that part, I want to give you a very, very shocking statistic. Here it is: according to recent studies, up to 28% of the average person’s time per day is spent in email-related activities.

Twenty-eight percent!

That’s almost one-third of your day being spent in processing emails, reading emails, sending emails – anything related to email. One-third. No wonder people are overwhelmed, unhappy and stressed out. When you spend one-third of your day in email-related activities, that doesn’t give you enough time to do all the other more important activities.

Less Emails Received = Less Time In Your Inbox

I want to show you today, how do you spend less of your time in email, and how do you finally get rid of the email overload? And I’m going to use a very simple technique, and that is reducing your emails. Reducing the emails that you get each and every day, because at the end of the day, the more emails you get, the more emails come to your inbox every single day, the more time you need to spend processing. It makes sense, right? The more emails you get, the more time you spend. The less emails you get, the less time you spend.

I want to show you four different sources of emails that you shouldn’t be getting – because I can promise you there’s at least four, five, maybe more emails per day that you shouldn’t be getting to begin with. Because we’re so busy, because we’re so used to go, go, go, and answering emails, replying to emails and whatnot, we don’t take the time to actually clean out our inbox in such a way that we don’t get the emails that we shouldn’t be getting.

I want to show you four different sources that are sending you a lot of email each and every day that you can completely eliminate. Once you eliminate the emails from all these four sources, your email count can go down by up to 75%. I’ve seen people lower their emails by 75%.

What would that do to you? What would that do to your productivity, if you get 75% less emails? Let’s find out. Let me show you what these four sources are.

1. Social Media Notifications

First of all, one of the biggest email offenders is social media. With the average person having more than five accounts and 130 friends on Facebook, social media is a big source of emails. Your friends are always going to be doing something, they’re always going to be active; so if you allow social media websites to send you emails with notifications, with “this friend did this,” “this friend did that,” you’re going to overwhelm yourself.

At the end of the day, these are not emails that you need to be getting. Because if you want to see what your friends are doing, you can log into Facebook, you can go on Twitter. All the information is right then and there. You don’t need to be getting those emails in your inbox.

Right now, or at the end of the video, I want you to grab all your social media accounts, log into them, and find a way to unsubscribe yourself from all notifications. If you let social media, whatever website you have an account on, send you emails every day, you’re going to get overwhelmed by information that you can find somewhere else.

Find all your social media accounts, log into them, and unsubscribe yourself. There is always an option that you can check out that doesn’t send you emails – or it sends you a lot less emails. Maybe it sends you a weekly email instead of daily emails. But check with your social media websites and unsubscribe from as many as you can.

“Successful By Design Lab” Member Extra

Access your “Inbox Firewall – Getting Rid of Unnecessary Emails”  video lesson in Successful By Design Lab.  

Learn how to go even deeper into cleaning out your inbox with this in-depth “Inbox Firewall” training.

Click here to access this 17-minute video.

Not a Lab member? Click here to learn more about SBD Lab.

2. Promo Emails

Another big offender of sending you useless emails are promotional emails. These are newsletters, these are coupons, these are deals. These are technically emails that you’re getting because you interacted with some website. Maybe you went online, you bought something, and now that company is sending you deals and coupons and weekly specials.

Whenever you get an email from one of these places, ask yourself, do you really want to get this email? Do you want to get this email over and over again? If the answer is yes, by all means, keep it. If the answer is no, then scroll down to the bottom of the email and unsubscribe yourself. There’s always going to be a link to unsubscribe, opt out, change your email settings – something that will allow you to prevent this company or this person from sending you emails over and over again.

Next time you get some sort of a promotional email, whether it’s a coupon, it’s a deal, it’s a newsletter, ask yourself, do you want to get it? If you want to get it, keep it. If you don’t want to get it, unsubscribe yourself. You don’t need to be getting these pointless emails each and every day, because you need to process them, and when you process them, you waste time. If you don’t get them in the first place, you don’t need to process them; you save a lot of time, you save a lot of energy.

3. “Funny” Forwards

The third place that reduces a lot of useless emails are what I call “funny” forwards. I put “funny” in quotation marks because they’re not always funny. These are the typical things that come from your friends, from family, from coworkers. They’re forwards of something funny or something religious or “Send this to 1000 of your friends and the magic genie is going to grant your wish.” You know what I’m talking about. You’ve received those, I’m sure, more than enough times.

Next time you get one, reply to that person that sent it to you and politely ask them, “Please, don’t send me these emails. They’re not interesting to me.” You don’t have to be afraid that you’re going to offend the other side. If you’re being polite about it and you just simply say, “Listen, I’m busy. I don’t want to receive these emails. Please don’t send them again,” 9 out of 10 cases, the other person is just going to say “Sure, no problem, okay,” and you’re not going to get emails from them. So the next time you get a forward of any kind from a colleague, a friend, even a family member, just politely ask them not to do it again. You’re going to reduce your email count by a lot.

4. Important But Not So Important

And the fourth place of receiving way too many emails that you don’t need to is important but not-so-important emails. What are these? These are emails that technically are useful to receive, but sometimes you don’t need to.

An example: your bank statement, payment statements, notifications that your bill is due. Usually, these are things that relate to some sort of financial. Maybe it’s you need to pay your phone bill. Maybe it’s how many minutes you’ve used on your phone, how much money you have in your bank account, when is your credit card due.

Technically, your credit card is going to be due every single month on the same day, so if you know that your bill is due on the 8th, put it on your calendar, put it on your to-do list. You don’t need to be getting a reminder. You don’t need to be getting a reminder of something that every single month is the same day. Or you don’t need to be getting a reminder that you’ve used that many minutes on your phone. If you care about this information, you can log in online and you can check out how many minutes you have left, or how much bandwidth on your internet you have left, or how much money you have in your bank account. All these emails, although they’re “important,” you don’t need to be getting, because you can log in online, you can check that information.

I know I get a lot of these, because I get one from my cell phone provider, I get one from my bank. I even get one from my domain register. And I know my domains, when they’re going to expire, if I want to let them expire – but I receive emails, “60 days. You have 60 days to renew your domain.” “You have 30 days.” “You have 10 days.” “You have 1 day.” “Oh my God, it expired yesterday.”

These are all emails that I don’t need to get, so I called up my company and I said, “Listen, I appreciate it. I’m on top of my game. I don’t need to be getting those emails. Please stop.” They click the button, they remove me from their email notification list, and now I get probably 10 or 20 emails less from that company per month. Multiply that by four, five, six companies that you’re dealing with – you’re going to get a lot less emails.

And these are emails that you don’t need to be getting. None of these are actually serving a purpose. Because social media, you can log into your social media account, you can see what your friends are doing. Promotional emails, 50% of them are a pure waste of time because you don’t even care about the company or the product that the email is about. “Funny” forwards sometimes are funny, but if you want funny things, you can go online, you can find them yourself. You don’t need to get your day interrupted by somebody forwarding you something. Important but not-so-important, you can log in online to your bank, to whatever website you have, and find that information. You don’t need to be getting them in your email.

And that’s how you reduce your email count by up to 75%. I’ve walked so many people through this process in my coaching practice, I’ve walked my friends, my family, even myself, so many times through this, and I’ve eliminated so many useless emails. At the end of the day, less emails equals less processing time.

Over To You Now

Next time you get an email, whether it’s from one of these four sources or somewhere else, ask yourself, “Do I need to get this email again? Would I care? Would I ever care about this information?” If the answer is yes, keep it. If the answer is no, find a way to unsubscribe yourself. Find a way to delete this email or call the company up or reply to your friend and say, “Don’t send me emails again.” That’s how you reduce your email count. That’s how you reduce your email overload. At the end of the day, the less emails you get, the less time you need to spend in your inbox.

So that’s it. It’s four of the biggest email offenders. Go through this process, eliminate as many emails as you can; it’s going to liberate you from having to spend so much time in your inbox. It’s going to lower your 28% to a lot lower, so you can spend your time where it matters more – be it with your friends, with your family, or actually working on something more important than email.

— End Transcript —

What other types of emails can you eliminate from your inbox to reduce your email overload? Share in the comment section below:

“Successful By Design Lab” Member Extra

Access your “Inbox Firewall – Getting Rid of Unnecessary Emails”  video lesson in Successful By Design Lab.  

Learn how to go even deeper into cleaning out your inbox with this in-depth “Inbox Firewall” training.

Click here to access this 17-minute video.

Not a Lab member? Click here to learn more about SBD Lab.